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 Post subject: muslim vegetarian?
 Post Posted: Sat Apr 25, 2009 7:07 pm 
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vegetarian food need to be certified halah 4 muslim?
a question throw to me this morning from my MIL:o

[Edited on 25-4-2009 by check]


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 Post Posted: Sat Apr 25, 2009 9:54 pm 
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Yes, they have to. So far, only Whole Earth, Gokul and Grand Court has it.


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 Post Posted: Sun Apr 26, 2009 11:15 am 
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but why? i thought halah only applies to non-veg food:o i mean prayer before killing that animal?

confused:(


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 Post Posted: Sun Apr 26, 2009 1:22 pm 
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Hey check, I would think Buddhist vegetarian food should be alright, but in some instance, vegetarian food contains alcohol like red wine, rice wine for flavouring (especially in Western veg food).

Also, for strict muslims, they might not be comfortable with where the mock meat is produced. Unless the factory is 100% dedicated to mock meat, if it produces other non-veg products, they would prefer certification to ensure that there is no cross contamination.

For me as a Muslim vegetarian, I will not go for veg options in a non-halal non-veg restaurant. If I don't have a choice of 100% veg restaurant, I will settle for veg food in a halal restaurant.

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 Post Posted: Sun Apr 26, 2009 1:40 pm 
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[align=justify]
Good question.

The problem is that Muslims are forbidden to eat anything that is not specifically Halal (note the spelling - it is not 'Halah'), meaning to say that no grey areas are allowed - if it is not certified Halal, they are not supposed to consume it, as simple as that. However, it is not feasible to practise this strictly in Singapore and hence, most Muslims will exercise discretion when it comes to non-meat products such as drinks and vegetarian food.

Perhaps you can appreciate the implications when you consider that although a vegetarian food operator may be selling only non-meat options, he is under no obligation to buy his ingredients from similarly-vegetarian sources.

For example, he may get his processed food (eg. stock cubes) from a supplier that has also other meat-related products (eg. pork stock, chicken stock etc.). Technically, the 'purity' of the vegetable stock then would be questionable and a Muslim should not consume the resulting food prepared by the stall.

This the reason why Muslim Vegetarians have great difficulty in balancing both their religious obligations and their personal philosophy. On the one hand, they can be 'religiously safe' in eating the vegetable options in Halal cuisine but in most cases (especially Malay food) there will be some form of animal by-product in the dishes. Then, on the other hand, they can rely of wholly vegetarian stalls/shops but have to assume the risk that the source of the ingredients may not be Halal.

No doubt, it is a difficult combination and most Muslim Vegetarians tend to allow their personal philosophy to take a higher priority than their religious obligation. I hope this gives you a better understanding of the dynamics involved.

[/align]

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 Post Posted: Sun Apr 26, 2009 2:07 pm 
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Quote:
Originally posted by halimah
Hey check, I would think Buddhist vegetarian food should be alright, but in some instance, vegetarian food contains alcohol like red wine, rice wine for flavouring (especially in Western veg food).

Also, for strict muslims, they might not be comfortable with where the mock meat is produced. Unless the factory is 100% dedicated to mock meat, if it produces other non-veg products, they would prefer certification to ensure that there is no cross contamination.

For me as a Muslim vegetarian, I will not go for veg options in a non-halal non-veg restaurant. If I don't have a choice of 100% veg restaurant, I will settle for veg food in a halal restaurant.


i think i understand this part:)
just like i feel uncomfortable when i c veg stall ppl eating non-veg food in their stall.:(

i've seen a chinese young lady eating chicken rice in the veg stall :o

[Edited on 26-4-2009 by check]


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 Post Posted: Sun Apr 26, 2009 2:10 pm 
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Quote:
Originally posted by Ganga
[align=justify]
Good question.

The problem is that Muslims are forbidden to eat anything that is not specifically Halal (note the spelling - it is not 'Halah'), meaning to say that no grey areas are allowed - if it is not certified Halal, they are not supposed to consume it, as simple as that. However, it is not feasible to practise this strictly in Singapore and hence, most Muslims will exercise discretion when it comes to non-meat products such as drinks and vegetarian food.

Perhaps you can appreciate the implications when you consider that although a vegetarian food operator may be selling only non-meat options, he is under no obligation to buy his ingredients from similarly-vegetarian sources.

For example, he may get his processed food (eg. stock cubes) from a supplier that has also other meat-related products (eg. pork stock, chicken stock etc.). Technically, the 'purity' of the vegetable stock then would be questionable and a Muslim should not consume the resulting food prepared by the stall.

This the reason why Muslim Vegetarians have great difficulty in balancing both their religious obligations and their personal philosophy. On the one hand, they can be 'religiously safe' in eating the vegetable options in Halal cuisine but in most cases (especially Malay food) there will be some form of animal by-product in the dishes. Then, on the other hand, they can rely of wholly vegetarian stalls/shops but have to assume the risk that the source of the ingredients may not be Halal.

No doubt, it is a difficult combination and most Muslim Vegetarians tend to allow their personal philosophy to take a higher priority than their religious obligation. I hope this gives you a better understanding of the dynamics involved.

[/align]


thks ganga:D i get a clearer picture now.


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 Post Posted: Mon Apr 27, 2009 9:59 am 
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Ganga is right on the balancing part. It's a rather delicate balance we have to manage when you're a muslim vegetarian. Another point about eating veg food from a non-halal estabishment is the utensils being used for pork. If it was used for non-halal chicken/beef/alcohol/etc, the utensils are still ok but not if it came into contact with pork. This is why vegetarian stalls that doesn't have a Halal cert in foodcourts are questionable for muslims because of the practise of central-washing for foodcourt cutleries.

However, after being vegetarian for a few years, when I'm out of choices, I have chosen to eat from vegetarian stalls that are not certified halal cuz seriously, it's such a rare species. But what I do is that I always "ta-pau" even if I'm eating there so that I don't use their cutlery. I justify by assuming they wash their own pots and pans but I could be wrong, I'm not sure.

When in foodcourts, I first check with the Muslim stall if they used shrimps and stuffs for the vegetables and if they do, I move on to the veg stall. As for non-halal establishment, I have opted to take their vegetarian food if they don't sell any pork. However, whenever possible I always opt to eat at a purely vegetarian establishment and check with the waiter if the dish I'm ordering contains cooking wine. Not all muslims would feel comfortable doing what I do and as Ganga said, no grey areas are allowed. Although it's an exception when you're in a place where purely halal food cannot be found like when you're travelling in Austria(example) or trapped in a natural disaster/etc.

Having said that, clear rules are there but eventually it still comes down to yourself, what your priorities are and how comfortable you are with the choices you made.

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 Post subject:
 Post Posted: Mon Apr 27, 2009 10:23 am 
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chinese "Zai" vegetarian stall do not sell food with cooking wine, onion or garlic as alcohol is forbidden.

As a chinese vegetarian, i always try my best to buy food which is label with the chinese word "Zai" to ensure there is at least an attempt on the part of the supplier to follow a chinese vegetarian standard based on buddhism.

For western food which only label "Suitable for vegans/vegetarian", i will not take as i do not know if it follow the buddhism definition of "vegetarian". Most of the time, the food contains garlic and onion anyway which i do not take.

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 Post Posted: Tue May 05, 2009 10:54 pm 
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A few years back there was a muslim vegetarian stall down at fortune centre ... managed by 2 muslims ladies ... the food not bad ... but maybe they couldn't create new dishes to get more biz and biz went down .... closed I think after a few months ... was quite happy to see muslims selling vegetarian food but alas ... couldn't maintain the biz ...

I am a hawker selling vegetatrian food .. I tendered for a halal stall to sell vegetarian b4 ... lots of certs I need to produce to muis to certify the stuffs that I am using is suitable for muslims... and need to hire at least a muslim helper ... frankly speaking it wasn't easy and I gave up the stall after 7 months and shifted to normal stall without the need of a halal cert ... but in the end I learnt alot about the halal requirements ...


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 Post Posted: Wed May 06, 2009 4:53 pm 
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Thank you for trying...

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